Shrouding & “Stealth” Towers

 

Shrouding.

Shrouding is often placed on towers to enhance the visual appeal of structures; the material is generally fiberglass and has no impact on the radio signals. (L) A tri-pole tower with shrouding in place. In addition to the antennas and radios that will be in place behind the shrouding, this tower also has a number of external antennas. (R) Shrouding can take place in conjunction with other features to help the cellphone tower blend with the surrounding area. This tower, in a shopping mall parking lot, has a clock, providing both cellular and chronograph service. While various antennas and radios are installed on this tower, a covered microwave dish is the most prominent feature in this image.

 

Stealth Towers.

To meet demands for increased mobile broadband service requires increasing amounts of infrastructure. Carriers and companies that provide tower services continue to explore ways to blend equipment into surrounding areas. (L) This flag pole will contain only antennas, with radios in cabinets near the base of the pole. (M) Religious organizations of different faiths often possess tall architectural features at their places of worship, which can be used to host telecom equipment and generate income. (R) Outside of urban areas, towers are often camouflaged as trees to better blend in with their environment.

 

Blending with buildings.

Beyond concealing towers, steps can be taken to blend cellular antennas. (L) Antennas concealed behind the sign shrouding provides cellular service for this marina. (M) Antennas often have fiberglass shells that can be colour matched to better blend with buildings. (R) Shrouding is being placed on these antennas on top of the building, to better have the cellular infrastructure better match the design aesthetic of the building.